Why Youth Programs Matter

Afterschool activities and summer programming lifts up the skills youth need to succeed in school, careers, and in life. It gives children and youth opportunities to:

Spark a new interest

in robotics or music

Offer youth-centered space

and sense of belonging

Build academic motivation

and social-emotional skills

Be in a safe place

while parents are at work

Get connected

to caring adults

Why afterschool matters

Afterschool activities help to lift up the skills youth need to succeed in school, careers, and in life. It gives children and youth opportunities to:

  • Spark a new interest — in robotics or music

  • Offer youth-centered space, sense of belonging

  • Build academic motivation and social-emotional skills

  • Get connected to caring adults

  • Be in a safe place while parents are at work

Youth increased their skills by participating in Detroit youth development programs, according to Youth Development Resource Center research.

Belonging

  • 56% 56%

56% of students improved relationships with peers and adults. 

Learning

  • 73% 73%

73% of students improved academic motivation, interesting in learning, critical thinking, and school bonding.

Learning

  • 72% 72%

73% of students improved academic motivation, interesting in learning, critical thinking, and school bonding.

Leading

  • 71% 71%

71% of students improved perseverance, assertiveness, action orientation, reflection, optimism, empathy, trust, and emotion control.

Proven Afterschool Results

In 2019, this percentage of youth who initially scored low improved their skills in the following areas through participation in quality youth development programs.

  • Academic Motivation: 78% 78% 78%
  • Assertiveness: 83% 84% 84%
  • Learning Interest: 78% 78% 78%
  • Action Orientation: 72% 78% 78%
  • Perserverence: 72% 72% 72%
  • Reflection: 76% 76% 76%

In 2019, this percentage of youth improved their skills in the following areas through participation in quality youth development programs.

  • Academic Motivation: 78% 78% 78%
  • Assertiveness: 83% 84% 84%
  • Learning Interest: 78% 78% 78%
  • Action Orientation: 72% 78% 78%
  • Perserverence: 72% 72% 72%
  • Reflection: 76% 76% 76%

Afterschool Learning

School-age kids spend 80 percent of their waking hours outside of school, according to our colleagues at Afterschool Alliance. After going to afterschool programs:

%

of students improve their homework completion and class participation.

%

of students improve their behavior in class.

%

of students improve their math and reading grades.

More than 70%

  • 72% 72%

of students in STEM afterschool programs express more interest in and knowledge about careers in science. They also build essential skills, such as perseverance and critical thinking.

Why summer Matters

School’s out! Summer is a great opportunity for children and youth to:

  • Spark a new interest — such as robotics or music
  • Build confidence and social skills
  • Have new experiences — through field trips, new friendships
  • Keep physically active
  • Get connected to caring adults
  • Develop skills to become lifelong learners
  • Be in a safe place while parents are at work

While summer represents time away from the classroom, it is a critical time to keep students engaged in learning. According to our colleagues at the National Summer Learning Association:

Summer Slide

Summer slide is what often happens to children from low-income households during the summer months. They tread water at best or even fall behind, while higher-income children build their skills steadily over the summer months.

Two Months

Most students lose two months of math skills every summer, and low-income children typically lose another two to three months in reading.

Two Months

Most students lose two months of math skills every summer, and low-income children typically lose another two to three months in reading.

Gap in Reading

Summer learning loss during elementary school accounts for two-thirds of the achievement gap in reading between low-income children and their middle-income peers by ninth grade.

The Achievement Gap

The achievement gap between children from high- and low-income families is roughly 30 to 40 percent larger among children born in 2001 than among those born 25 years earlier.

The Achievement Gap

The achievement gap between children from high- and low-income families is roughly 30 to 40 percent larger among children born in 2001 than among those born 25 years earlier.

Summer Learning Programs

Summer learning loss during elementary school accounts for two-thirds of the achievement gap in reading between low-income children and their middle-income peers by ninth grade.

9 in 10 Teachers

Nine in ten teachers spend at least three weeks re-teaching lessons at the start of the school year.

9 in 10 Teachers

Nine in ten teachers spend at least three weeks re-teaching lessons at the start of the school year.

 

Ready to find

 

 

Your child's program?

 

English Español

Pin It on Pinterest